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Nokia may have just announced an ambition to make Windows Phone 7 its primary smartphone OS but prior to that, the company had all kinds of plans involving Symbian and MeeGo, the Linux-based OS it developed in conjunction with Intel. Here’s a device that the company filed a patent for last year. 

and just recently published by the U.S Patent and Trademark Office, the patent sketches portray an N8-like tablet but reveal little about the specs or even the OS of the device. We can see a smattering of ports along one side of the device, but other than that, there’s not much else to see. Since this patent was discovered by Boy Genius Report, Electronista managed to. Also filed in May of 2010, the design of the second tablet is a little different to the first, but again, the filing offers nothing else in the way of information about specifications or operating systems.

It’s very likely these are tablets that have been shelved since Nokia’s decision to move away from MeeGo and towards Windows Phone 7, but you never know.

Further Reading:

When it comes to PC accessories, few manufacturers come close to matching Logitech’s massive portfolio.

Today only, Amazon is taking up to 30% off a handful of Logitech’s best accessories including some of its mice, keyboards, and a 2.1 speaker system. The sale includes many of our favorite Logitech devices, such as:

K400 Plus Wireless Touch Keyboard: The K400 Plus is a wireless TV keyboard designed to let you navigate your smart TV from the comforts of your couch. It features a built-in, 3.5-inch touchpad and media playback keys.

Logitech K400 Plus Wireless Keyboard

HD Pro Webcam C920: The C920 is proof that standalone webcams still have a place in today’s tech world. Its image quality surpasses that of many built-in webcams and at $46.84, it’s the lowest price we’ve ever seen for it. The 1080p webcam is flanked by LEDs and microphones and features a 78-degree field of view, which is more than enough to squeeze a second person into the frame.

Logitech C920 Webcam

MX Master Mouse: The MX Master Mouse combines a gorgeous, ergonomic design with a host of intelligent features. It’s an excellent every day mouse designed strictly for productivity. Although Logitech sells it for $100, today it’s selling for $49.99 on Amazon.

Logitech MX Master Mouse

Z523 Speakers: Whether you’re playing games or streaming movies, this 2.1 speaker system offers room-filling, 360-degree sound. The accompanying down-firing subwoofer features a 6.5-inch pressure driver with ultra-deep bass.

Logitech Z523 2.1 Speaker System

This Logitech sale ends today and only applies to items sold via Amazon (excluding third-party merchants).

Not in the mood to hack the PSP?offers a $90 clone that serves as an emulator, playing old classics found on Sega’s MegaDrive, Nintendo’s Famicom, and other classic consoles.

Called the PXP-900, this Mp5 player isn’t merely a hardware emulator, but offers other features that should have come with Sony’s PSP in the first place. But don’t let its appearance be deceptive: the device doesn’t have the capability to play PSP games, and honestly, it’s a wonder that Sony doesn’t crack down on the manufacturer for mimicking the PSP look and control scheme so close to the original.

According to China Grabber, the PXP-900 has an internal memory capacity of 2 GB, but is also capable of accepting SD cards up to 4 GB. On the video side, the device sports a 4.3-inch QVGA TFT LCD screen (320×240 resolution, 16:9 aspect ratio), churns out 25 FPS  during emulation, and also offers a cool TV-out function. Additionally, the PXP-900 has a built-in camera, FM radio, a loudspeaker, and MP3/MP4 drag-n-drop capabilities; Sony’s PSP doesn’t feature any one of these items.

And unlike the PSP, the PXP-900’s specs reveal that a built-in Ebook reader supposedly will read aloud any TXT file in Chinese or English. A movie bookmark feature will allow the viewer to return to the specified place in the movie at any time. There also seems to be a built-in microphone as well, recording sounds in WAV format. However, the lack of network information in the specifications probably means that that the device doesn’t have Wi-Fi capabilities. This means that anything downloaded for the device–whether it’s a console rom or a converted movie–can’t be done across the network, but rather through a USB connection to the PC.

Of course, the built-in emulator is probably the device’s biggest selling point. While the company didn’t offer any specifics, the software is capable of running games from classic consoles including the NES, Famicom, GameBoy, GameBoy Color, and Sega’s MegaDrive; the emulator supports the 32-bit Super Famicom and MegaDrive CD-ROM (aka Sega CD in the States) games as well. While it’s not apparent if the portable emulator will come packed with pre-loaded ROMs, the company did say that gamers can download additional titles. Are these games legal? We assume that’s a ‘yes,’ however China Grabber did not provide additional details on availability, pricing, or method of acquiring the games.

Still, for roughly $90, consumers will get the portable emulator, a user manual, earphones, an AV-Out cable, a USB cable, and a power adaptor. The unit comes in four standard colors–black, white, blue, and red–and is powered by built-in rechargeable lithium batteries (notice the plural). Additionally, the PXP-900 works with Windows 98, 98 SE, ME, 200, XP, Mac OS 10, and Linux 2.4.2 operating systems; the company did not specify Windows Vista or the upcoming Windows 7 OS in the product details.

While we haven’t checked out the device in-house, the specs certainly sound better than Sony’s PSP in certain aspects, especially with the built-in camera, Ebook reader, and console emulator. ON a graphical level, the PXP-900 doesn’t stand up to the PSP–at least not in a gaming aspect. In all actuality, the PXP-900’s cheap price tag means that consumers could have the best of both worlds, especially if they already own Sony’s portable gaming device.

If you frequently send and receive video messages via Skype and wish there were a way to download the clips to your phone, a new update might just make your day.

The latest version of Skype for Android lets you save video messages you’ve sent and received to your gallery so you can keep them for posterity (or blackmail). It’s only available for video messages, meaning clips that you send to your friends over Skype IM, not the video calls you make.

  1. Update to the latest version of(6.11) on your Android device.
  2. Long press the video you want to save in the conversation window.
  3. Select Save To Gallery.
  4. Open your Movies or Videos folder on your phone to find the clip.

The way Logitech sees it, setting up a video-conferencing system for your office shouldn’t be a choice between a high-end system that costs thousands of dollars and a laptop’s built-in camera that everyone crowds around. The latest version of the company’s conference-camera product, the $999 Logitech Group, combines an HD video camera and full-duplex speakerphone.

Slated for an early March release, Logitech Group is designed for conferences containing up to 14 people. Add a $300 set of optional expansion microphones to the setup, and you can fit 20 people in on a conference.

Those participating in a video conference will be staring at a 1080p camera with a 90-degree field of view and pan-and-tilt controls. On-board H.264 with scalable video coding aims to provide a smoother video stream, according to Logitech. The camera connects to an existing Mac or PC via USB, which should simplify installation.

Logitech focuses on the hardware. In terms of software, Logitech Group works with video-conferencing tools your office is likely to already be using. Logitech says its latest conference camera works with Microsoft Lync, Skype, Jabber, WebEx and BlueJeans.

‘We’re trying to create a simple product that competes with higher-end options,’ said Scott Wharton, Logitech vice president and general manager for video collaboration.

Logitech Group replaces Logitech’s previous conference-camera offering, the lyrically named CC3000e. This version promises audio improvements with four omnidirectional microphones instead of just one. The microphones use beamforming and noise-canceling technology for clearer conversations. That expansion microphone option is also new, increasing the range of the speakerphone to a 28-foot diameter from 20 feet.

I briefly got a chance to see the Logitech Group in action. Video looked clean and crisp, even when the camera zoomed in on something in the meeting room. I think offices will be just as impressed with the simple setup process, which is a matter of plugging in the camera and phone rather than going through an elaborate installation routine.

‘You don’t need an IT department,’ Wharton said of the setup process.

Usually, we’re exactly the kind of people when it comes to R2-D2 anything,or, we’d probably be up for pretty much anything, if it’s done right. We just can’t make decide if this music player from Toys R Us has been done right.

Boasting 2GB of storage, this little guy also has a little color display around back along with some hardware buttons for all your skip, back, play, pause and volume needs. However, as Technabob points out, the image itself looks a little fishy. It’s got a distinct whiff of iPod to it and we’re not sure if it’s genuine. While there’s every chance the device does have a snazzy color display, it’s not mentioned in the product details (though the buttons are), so we don’t want you to get your hopes up only to discover it doesn’t look like the photo.

Pricewise, you’re looking at $45, and Toys R Us recommends this for kids aged 6 – 8 years. What do you think? Good choice for a kid’s first music player or a total waste of money?

After a lengthy merger approval process, Sirius-XM finally merged its channelacross both services in November 2008.  This was heralded as the signs of a new satellite radio service that would be beneficial to its subscribers.  However, rumors of the possibility of rate increases had been surfacing amidst these new changes.

As confirmed by its own respective websites,andsubscribers can expect an official rate increase beginning on March 11, 2009.  The reason stated by Sirius-XM is that its online audio stream will be upgrading to a 128 KB stream, which its claiming to be ‘near CD-Quality’.  This change will therefore cost subscribers $2.99 additional per month.

that can receive signals from both service’s satellites.  Sirius-XM is the only provider of commercial satellite radio in the U.S. and had$30.5 million of debt for 67 million common shares in 2008.  Reduced earnings and subscription numbers were blamed on the 27% drop in new vehicle sales in the U.S. last year.  Sirius-XM has $995 million in debt that will be due for repayment in 2009; its currently inwith its debtors on repayment terms.

What? Huh? There’s Bluetooth in my touchy little iPod Touch? It’s probably a given that many consumers had no idea the device has Bluetooth capabilities, remaining dormant… until now.

In all the hoopla regarding the iPhone and the upcoming 3.0 OS, it’s less-than-loaded half-twin, the iPod Touch 2G (second generation), sat just off stage, wishing it could chime in on some of the spotlight. But, instead of sulking and hanging its head low, the iPod Touch listened, waited, bid its time until someone caught on that the new OS update would unlock a secret treasure laying dormant within. No, it’s not an Alien embryo waiting to burst through the cavity of its slick, touchscreen surface. It’s another blue little demon altogether: the sacred Bluetooth.

For many consumers, the revelation of this feature is quite a pleasant surprise. But for tech-savvy fans who have kept up with the technology powering the device, they may already be aware of the Broadcom BCM4325 wireless communications chip planted within; it was discovered back in September 2008 in a hardware tear-down performed by. To be more specific, the uncovered Broadcom chip was found capable of single-band 2.4GHz 802.11b/g, dual-band 2.4GHz and 5GHz 802.11a/b/g.  Additionally, it had Bluetooth 2.1 + EDR support and an advanced FM receiver. Simply put, Wi-Fi and Bluetooth capabilities were already present in the iPod Touch, with the latter deactivated via software.

At the time, it was widely speculated that the chip was mainly used to communicate with the Nike+ iPod sensor puck accessory, however some believed that perhaps Apple had other sinister plans for the Bluetooth portion, and just wasn’t in the mood to share the Bluetooth goodness just yet. Evidently the speculators were correct, as it’s now official that the iPod Touch 2G is fully capable of Bluetooth audio and data transmission, able to carry out Bluetooth functions such as wireless streaming 2-channel audio with A2DP, wireless accessory control (perhaps for gaming), and peer-to-peer connections. The upcoming 3.0 OS will enable these features, costing consumers $9.95 to upgrade the current OS to 3.0.

It’s not uncommon to see device manufacturers stuff their products with deactivated components, or locking said components via firmware by the request of the supplier. Many Verizon subscribers have lashed out at the wireless provider, having ‘locked’ the built-in GPS chip in BlackBerry devices from 3rd-party navigational applications. Thus, Verizon Wireless customers must subscribe to its VZNavigator subscription service, shelling out an additional $10 per month just for it use alone (not including any data packages). As it stands, BlackBerry users on Verizon cannot use the real-time navigational features in other applications such Google Maps, Yahoo maps and so on, having to settle with triangulation options instead.

However, for a one-time fee of $10, the 3.0 OS upgrade for Apple’s iPod Touch seems to be worth every penny, offering not only the new Bluetooth features, but other vast improvements that will make the device that much more useful and fun to play. With peer-to-peer connections, gaming will become even more prominent on the device, offering local multiplayer support previously limited to Wi-Fi connections.

Look for the 3.0 OS upgrade sometime this summer.

An. As it stands now, the current PlayStation 3 is an excellent entertainment hub given that customers aren’t forced to pay an added ‘network fee’ (like Xbox Live) to access subscriptions such as Netflix and Hulu Plus. The drawback is that the PlayStation 3’s non-gaming offering isn’t quite as robust as the Xbox 360, but perhaps that will change with the new console.

According to the unnamed official, the main selling point of the PlayStation 4 will be new styles of play, not the updated hardware set which supposedly includes a rumored eight-core AMD64 CPU. If anything, Sony will promote the new hardware as a means of breaking away from the traditional console mindset by allowing mobile devices to connect and share media and other goods. It will be the ‘nerve center’ of your house, the official claimed.

. Unlike OnLive which serves up a streaming subscription, rentals and full-blown game purchases directly to members, Gaikai serves as the middleman between the seller and the buyer — it’s a platform only. There’s a good chance PlayStation 4 owners will be able to purchase games from Sony that can be stored and streamed from the cloud.

That said, it’s quite possible PC-based games provided by SOE could be offered on the console as well like EverQuest 2 or the just-launched Wizardry Online (aka speculation). The paper said that the console will be ‘fully networked’ and ‘be furnished with the ability to exchange opinions amongst one’s friends while playing games.’ A fully-networked console could mean it will be dual-band so that it can access the less-congested 5 GHz band on compatible networks, thus improving streaming performance.

 

 

Amazon.com today introduced the company’s second generation electronic reader, the Kindle 2. The follow up from the company’s successful Kindle ebook reader offers customers a slim new design with longer battery life, faster page turns, over seven times more storage, sharper images, and a new read-to-me feature.

Rumors that Amazon was about to unveil the next Kindle did the rounds at the very end of January. The company announced it would be holding a press conference at the Morgan Library in New York City on February 9; and while there was no mention as to whether or not we’d see the revamped Kindle, the notice on the Kindle site that says orders placed for the device will ship in 4-6 weeks didn’t go unnoticed, especially when you consider the Kindle drought a result of the device’s Oprah debut. 

Despite the fact that the newest Kindle sports a 600 x 800 6-inch electronic paper display that looks and reads like real paper, most will be a little disappointed to find out there’s still no touch screen on Amazon’s reader. With 2 GB of memory, Kindle 2 can hold more than 1,500 books, compared with 200 with the original Kindle. More memory is always welcome and Amazon has kept the price for this version the same as the old: $349

A few hours before the event, word went around that Stephen King would be launching the Kindle and true enough, the novelist was there. King said he would be writing a story for the Kindle and he read an excerpt of ‘Ur’ to the crowd, which is actually about a Kindle and sounds completely dire, but there you go.

‘Author Stephen King announced today that he is releasing a novella, “Ur,” which will only be available on Kindle. At the center of Ur is lovelorn college English instructor Wesley Smith, who can’t seem to get his ex-girlfriend’s parting shot out of his head: ‘Why can’t you just read off the computer like the rest of us?’ Egged on by her question and piqued by a student’s suggestion, Wesley places an order for a Kindle. Smith’s Kindle arrives in a box stamped with the smile logo and unlocks a literary world that even the most avid of book lovers could never imagine. But once the door is open, there are those things that one hopes we’ll never read or live through.

Customers can preorder now and units are set to ship February 24.